“Problems”, Excerpt from Chapter 18, The Natural Laws of Management

Individuals producing a product often will encounter barriers and problems. Problems are not something to be avoided; they are really something to be welcomed. If we are going to play a game, which we’re certainly doing in business and life, we’re trying to move from A to B. Obviously, as a game, it’s going to have opposition. What we might call problems are really challenges or opportunities. Why get uptight about it? If you are going to play a game, there is going to be opposition. Can you imagine if you are playing football, somebody tackles you and you say, “Get off of me! What are you doing?”

What we might call problems are really challenges or opportunities. Why get uptight about it? If you are going to play a game, there is going to be opposition. Can you imagine if you are playing football, somebody tackles you and you say, “Get off of me! What are you doing?”

 

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“Solving problems entails locating the causes. Locating the causes entails observation.”

 

You can be “reasonable” about your problems too. If you’ve had a difficulty or a problem for quite some time, and it’s not solving, I can promise you that it’s not the problem. You cannot solve the wrong problem. I have never found anybody who didn’t have terrific solutions. It’s not solutions you need; it’s the perception necessary to locate the actual problem so that you are not dealing only with symptoms. In fact, the sanest reaction is to “own the problems” rather than being detached from them as a spectator (someone who is never really involved, so they can’t get close enough to inspect the real reason).

It’s been said that if we all took our problems, put them all on the table, and left the room—and you could come back and choose any set of problems you wanted—which ones do you think you’d choose? Your own! That’s right. You’re used to them. They’re yours.

Some people are in love with their problems! Did you ever have somebody tell you a very complex problem, this complex thing that had absolutely “no solution”? Perhaps you listened and you listened and at the end, you said, “Oh, I’ll tell you what you can do about that. That’s simple. Just do this.” What do they say? “Naw, naw. That won’t work. I tried that.” “No, it will work,” you say, “It’ll work. It’s easy. You can’t see it ‘cause you’re in it. I’m telling you…” And if you persist they get uptight and say, “You don’t understand my problem.” (This thing that they’ve worked so hard to put together that had no solution!)

And what if you had no problems at all? None! Everything that you attempted to do, you did. You had no opposition. You’d probably invent problems just to have some kind of game! Show me a person who has a lot of “unsolvable” problems and I’ll show you someone who doesn’t have enough problems. They have such a scarcity of problems that they are making a meal out of the ones that they have for fear that if they lost this problem they wouldn’t have anymore.

A person begins to suffer from problems when he does
not have enough of them. There is the old saw (maxim)
that if you want a thing done give it to a busy man to do.
Similarly, if you want a happy associate make sure that
he is a man who can have lots of problems.1

The next time somebody gives you all their problems, don’t give them an easy solution because that takes the game away. What you’ve got to do is when they’ve finished this long dissertation, this complex problem, you say, “That is the worst thing I’ve ever heard. How are you possibly going to handle that?” They’ll probably say, “No, wait a minute. That’s not so difficult. I can handle that.”

Solving problems entails locating the causes. Locating the causes entails observation.

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

 

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Author, Arte Maren

 

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1 Hubbard, “The Reason Why,” Bulletin No. 84, 15 May 1956.

 

 

Arte Maren Talks About the Administrative Scale of Importance

Arte Maren, business consultant, and author talks about the Administrative Scale as outlined in his book The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale:

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

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Author, Arte Maren

 

 

 

If You Fail to Plan, You Plan to Fail!

planning-to-succeed-natural-laws-of-management-arte-marenPlanning is a very important and easily learned technology. It has often been said that if you fail to plan, you plan to fail. So true. But a real plan (and I define a good plan as one that gets done,) is not a list of to-do items. It is the creation of your future.

“THE SUCCESS OF ANY EVENT IS DIRECTLY PROPORTIONAL TO THE TIMELY PREPARATION.”1

Excerpt from my book The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale, Chapter 11, PREPARATION, Page 51.

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

 

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant

Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

 

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Author, Arte Maren

1 Hubbard, policy letter titled Too Little Too Late

 

 

 

Sales Gold: Converting Want Into Demand, Part II

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It’s not what they say, it’s how they feel. A common sales error which leaves fails to escalate from want to demand is misinterpreting the reason given for the real reason for your product or service.

Prospect:  “The equipment keeps breaking down; I need something dependable.  Salesperson: “Oh, our product is very high quality and never needs repair.” This is “sales noise” and omits probing. What equipment does he have? (vital to know not only in the sales process but for competition intelligence also). Hmmmm…good brand…should not be breaking down. More probing needed. (I never take the first thing the prospect offers as the buying signal or real reason of the need until I dig in and get an emotional reaction: a smile, a realization, a comment that is not in the level of boredom).

Rule: Don’t mistake a comment for the real reason. It is something you DISCOVER. New to you, and ideally new to the prospect.

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

 

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant

Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

 

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Author, Arte Maren

 

 

 

Goals Are a Luxury Earned Through Production

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Excerpt from The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale, Chapter 4, VALUABLE FINAL PRODUCTS, Page 17

“While goals are vital, it is so much harder (and less efficient) to judge effectiveness by a person’s verbalized or even written goals than by what that person actually produces. One doesn’t often hear, “Boy, he sure can turn out a good goal.” In fact, too often goals are used as a substitute or excuse for production. Something has to come out the end of the conveyor belt of production and it shouldn’t be good intentions alone.

“Successful people do have very pro-survival goals and purposes. You can see the products of such people around you. But if good intentions actually exist, then they should manifest as valuable final products.”

 

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant

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Author, Arte Maren

Ask Arte: A Question and Answer Period with Arte Maren

Question: When presenting my product or service in the sales process how can I best judge the prospect’s interest level?

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Arte:  Judging interest level is a step that is done AFTER rapport—a connection would be another way to express it—has been established (without which actual interest could be submerged due to lack of affinity).  In the Hubbard management system we refer to it as a “communication line”, meaning there is a palpable connection from salesperson to prospect.

There are several steps to be considered BEFORE one is concerned about interest level. In fact, the interest level is CREATED by these earlier steps.

Having established a “comm line”, one must then determine, discover, and remove any barriers which are present due to prior poor experience with your or similar product or service.

Note well: You cannot get a valid interest level in your product or service if the actual/real interest potential is suppressed by a prior negative of some nature (which could be personal experience, negative word of mouth or rumor).

Having cleared the barriers, you may THEN begin to judge interest by determining WHY they might want the product or service AND to what degree.  This probing section is where you are interested, not interesting.  What is the prospect trying to handle or why do they feel they need your product?  And, knowing what your product or service DOES handle, and handles well, search for their needs.  How?  By KNOWING the “ideal” for their area/industry/product or service within which they deliver.  What would it look like if it was operating optimally (see chapter 22 “The Ideal Scene” in my book The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale at www.adminscale.net).

When comparing your concept of the optimal condition for the prospects company or activity, you can then determine the area or areas most likely in need of your product as the comparison will reveal a departure from that optimal condition.   You will then be able to more easily perceive a potential need and explore it for prospect reaction.  And if it is proving fruitful, pursue it deeper with further questioning in the area.  The rule here: Possible area of need?  Dig Deeper.

Here’s an example of a huge amateur mistake: Prospect tells you they need the product or service because they are “not very good at explaining the product” and the salesperson then proceeds to explain how their product or service totally handles that and here is why…blah, blah, blah.  When, in fact, through digging deeper for exactly WHAT troubles they have in “explaining the product” you may well discover that they have very poor communication skills as the real difficulty.  Another possibility is they, in fact, don’t think the product or service is actually that valuable (real event in my sales career more than once).  And there can be other possibilities such as they do know how to present but someone in their environment is invalidating their abilities.

So, how do you know if your prospect has interest?  By determining, through the 3 steps indicated above, the most important reason for their purchasing your product or service—from their viewpoint—and THEN explaining why and how your product or service handles THAT.

When you provide the solution to a problem that the prospect knows he has but has not been able to handle, you are in positive buying attitude on the part of the prospect. When you discover A NEED THAT THE PROSPECT DID NOT KNOW THAT THEY HAD, WHICH IS CONTRIBUTING TO OR ACTUALLY CAUSING THE UNDERLYING SITUATION WHICH THEY ARE COMPLAINING ABOUT, you are Golden Done Deal.  Wrap it up and take the order.

What about the “Close?” Oh, that? That comes NATURALLY and effortlessly when having done the above.  It is simply Natural Law.

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Arte Maren has 40 years experience in sales and administration and is the author of The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale. For more information: www.adminscale.net.

Copyright © ArteMaren, 2017.  All Rights Reserved.

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How Does Selling Relate to Exchange?

Although my book, The Natural Laws of Management, is all about management alignment technology, I have provided quite a bit of information on the subject of sales (since I am celebrating my 50th year since my first sales experience and have been selling ever since).

This excerpt is the start of the viewpoint that selling has gotten a bad reputation due to the fact that it is not observed or perceived, even by the salesperson, as a win-win affair. And it is. And the sale is made, to the degree that it is. (Those who go “out-exchange” with their customer, soon no longer are in the sales industry as it becomes less and less “fun” (Yes, providing a needed item or service is FUN,) and more laborious (can I hear “Death of a Salesman” anyone?)

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“Selling has a bad reputation. It’s come to mean, in some cases, “forcing something on someone that they don’t want and can’t afford.” That’s not selling. Selling has been a major force in the creation of American society. It’s been a vital link between the producer and the consumer. And the derivation of the word “sell” comes from an old English word sellen, which means “to get, deliver.” It’s the ability to place your product into the hands of the consumer on a rapid basis.

Excerpt from The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale, Chapter 7, Page 32

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant

Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

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