“Problems”, Excerpt from Chapter 18, The Natural Laws of Management

Individuals producing a product often will encounter barriers and problems. Problems are not something to be avoided; they are really something to be welcomed. If we are going to play a game, which we’re certainly doing in business and life, we’re trying to move from A to B. Obviously, as a game, it’s going to have opposition. What we might call problems are really challenges or opportunities. Why get uptight about it? If you are going to play a game, there is going to be opposition. Can you imagine if you are playing football, somebody tackles you and you say, “Get off of me! What are you doing?”

What we might call problems are really challenges or opportunities. Why get uptight about it? If you are going to play a game, there is going to be opposition. Can you imagine if you are playing football, somebody tackles you and you say, “Get off of me! What are you doing?”

 

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“Solving problems entails locating the causes. Locating the causes entails observation.”

 

You can be “reasonable” about your problems too. If you’ve had a difficulty or a problem for quite some time, and it’s not solving, I can promise you that it’s not the problem. You cannot solve the wrong problem. I have never found anybody who didn’t have terrific solutions. It’s not solutions you need; it’s the perception necessary to locate the actual problem so that you are not dealing only with symptoms. In fact, the sanest reaction is to “own the problems” rather than being detached from them as a spectator (someone who is never really involved, so they can’t get close enough to inspect the real reason).

It’s been said that if we all took our problems, put them all on the table, and left the room—and you could come back and choose any set of problems you wanted—which ones do you think you’d choose? Your own! That’s right. You’re used to them. They’re yours.

Some people are in love with their problems! Did you ever have somebody tell you a very complex problem, this complex thing that had absolutely “no solution”? Perhaps you listened and you listened and at the end, you said, “Oh, I’ll tell you what you can do about that. That’s simple. Just do this.” What do they say? “Naw, naw. That won’t work. I tried that.” “No, it will work,” you say, “It’ll work. It’s easy. You can’t see it ‘cause you’re in it. I’m telling you…” And if you persist they get uptight and say, “You don’t understand my problem.” (This thing that they’ve worked so hard to put together that had no solution!)

And what if you had no problems at all? None! Everything that you attempted to do, you did. You had no opposition. You’d probably invent problems just to have some kind of game! Show me a person who has a lot of “unsolvable” problems and I’ll show you someone who doesn’t have enough problems. They have such a scarcity of problems that they are making a meal out of the ones that they have for fear that if they lost this problem they wouldn’t have anymore.

A person begins to suffer from problems when he does
not have enough of them. There is the old saw (maxim)
that if you want a thing done give it to a busy man to do.
Similarly, if you want a happy associate make sure that
he is a man who can have lots of problems.1

The next time somebody gives you all their problems, don’t give them an easy solution because that takes the game away. What you’ve got to do is when they’ve finished this long dissertation, this complex problem, you say, “That is the worst thing I’ve ever heard. How are you possibly going to handle that?” They’ll probably say, “No, wait a minute. That’s not so difficult. I can handle that.”

Solving problems entails locating the causes. Locating the causes entails observation.

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

 

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Author, Arte Maren

 

Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

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1 Hubbard, “The Reason Why,” Bulletin No. 84, 15 May 1956.

 

 

Arte Maren Talks About the Administrative Scale of Importance

Arte Maren, business consultant, and author talks about the Administrative Scale as outlined in his book The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale:

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

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Author, Arte Maren

 

 

 

Goals Are a Luxury Earned Through Production

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Excerpt from The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale, Chapter 4, VALUABLE FINAL PRODUCTS, Page 17

“While goals are vital, it is so much harder (and less efficient) to judge effectiveness by a person’s verbalized or even written goals than by what that person actually produces. One doesn’t often hear, “Boy, he sure can turn out a good goal.” In fact, too often goals are used as a substitute or excuse for production. Something has to come out the end of the conveyor belt of production and it shouldn’t be good intentions alone.

“Successful people do have very pro-survival goals and purposes. You can see the products of such people around you. But if good intentions actually exist, then they should manifest as valuable final products.”

 

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant

Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

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Author, Arte Maren

The Natural Laws of Management: The Admin Scale, Chapter 3, SOLUTIONS

solutions-and-answer-hunger-business-management

This demand for any solution “right now,” regardless of workability, comes about from what L. Ron Hubbard identified as ‘Answer Hunger’:

“An unfinished cycle of communication generates what might be called ‘answer hunger.’  When an individual has, for a very long period of time, consistently waited for answers which did not arrive–any sort of answer, from anywhere, will be pulled in to him, by him, as an effort to remedy his scarcity for answers.”1

In fact, Mr. Hubbard isolated this ‘answer hunger’ phenomenon as the cause of rumor, in The Law of the Omitted Data:

WHERE THERE IS NO DATA AVAILABLE, PEOPLE WILL INVENT IT.“2

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant
1 Hubbard, “Communication”, chapter of Dianetics 55, page 107.
2  Hubbard, “How to Handle Black Propaganda”, Policy Letter of 21 November 1972.
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Author, Arte Maren

Do You Have Your Admin Scale?

What is the Difference Between a Goal and a Purpose?

Look at it this way: The road is Purpose, leading towards a Goal.

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As L. Ron Hubbard points out, a Goal is “the prime intention”, and a Purpose is “the survival route chosen by an individual, a species, or a unit of matter or energy in the accomplishment of its goal.”

Purpose is how you have chosen to accomplish the goal. The goal is the ultimate destination, with the purpose being the road you have taken to accomplish the arrival.

For instance, some have the goal of “Improving the health of people so that they experience a better quality of life”, and there are many methods and “roads” to accomplish this: Nutritionist, Chiropractor, Counselor, etc.

When determining a purpose or goal with a client, I will often ask, “So, if that is accomplished or done, what do you then have?” If I can go no further without getting into the ludicrous or way far out, I know that I have a goal in hand.

If you take the above as an example, a step up from “Improving the health of people so that they experience a higher or better quality of life”, would lead us to nowhere. But, if the goal had been stated as “Providing effective nutrition data to clients”, it would easily yield to the next step up: “Better quality of life”.

This, therefore, indicates that “Providing effective nutrition data to clients” is not a goal, but a purpose, leading to a higher purpose, so to speak.

Happy Trails.

Arte Maren, International Speaker, Writer and Business Consultant

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Arte Maren, Author, Speaker and Business Consultant

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Do You Have Your Admin Scale?